Making Aid More Effective: Base it on People Power!

At the end of November, leaders of rich and poor countries from around the world will gather in Busan, South Korea, to discuss how they can make aid more effective.

As set out in our earlier blog posts, this is an important meeting, as it tries to set a course for Governments on how to achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

The meeting in Busan follows up on early summits on this issue, in particular the 2005 Paris Declaration and the 2008 Accra Agenda for Action, which were organised as aid donors realised that the current donor landscape is not conducive to delivering on the MDGs. Click here to read remaining article.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Making Aid More Effective: Base it on People Power!

  1. How to effectively aid in a rural village:

    -Establish a bi-gender village “Elder Council”

    -Make a village internet education centre where villagers can self-educate about methods of self-sufficiency, methods of permaculture gardening, earthbag house construction, spirulina cultivation, etc.

    -Provide minimal investment such as plastic earthbags, so they can begin construction on whichever communal projects the Elder Council deems is most important.

    -Provide translations of youtube educational videos.

    -Provide some expertise guidance (one web page would suffice for all villages), recommending a tested system

    (eg,, starting with algae production and earthbag construction initial investment is minimal, and future construction is funded by algae profits.

    eg., compost production is near-zero investment since most Indians burn everything that can be burnt, and is the basis for any other plant cultivation.)

    If villagers can start turning a profit after two months, with only a $20 investment for a small spirulina pond, then they can start taking care of themselves immediately. If the children have access to the internet they will educate themselves about all needed technologies, cultivation methods, energy production, etc.

    See the “One Laptop Per Child” experiment in Ethiopia, where they left tablets in a village and illiterate children learned to read without any direct human assistance.

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